Appeals

Sometimes a party to a lawsuit is not satisfied with the trial judge’s decision. When that happens that person might want to file an appeal. Generally, and in all divorce cases in all three local jurisdictions, you can appeal “as of right.” You may not win but you can appeal.

The party who appeals is called the appellant. The other party is called the appellee. Often the appellee will appeal the portions of the trial judge’s decision that he or she is not satisfied with and become the appellee/cross-appellant.
In due course, if the appellant and, if applicable, the cross-appellant, do all the required filing correctly and on time, the appellate court judges will review the contested portions of the trial judge’s decision. The appellate judges give deference to the trial judge’s findings of fact because he or she saw and heard the witnesses and the appellate judges did not. Findings of fact are not disturbed unless they are “clearly erroneous.”

The appellate court judges do not give deference to the trial judge’s rulings regarding the law. If they conclude the trial judge was wrong, they reverse. Usually though, that means they remand the case back to the trial judge to conduct a further hearing, if necessary, and generally preside over the remainder of case consistently with appellate court’s ruling.

Related posts:

  1. Life Insurance to Assure Payment of Child Support
  2. JDR, Fault Divorce or Wait

Tags:

Subscribe

Related posts:

  1. Life Insurance to Assure Payment of Child Support
  2. JDR, Fault Divorce or Wait

Leave a Reply

 
© 2018 Thyden Gross and Callahan LLP. All rights reserved.