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Thyden Gross and Callahan LLPCounselors and Attorneys at Law

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FATHERS’ RIGHTS
NOT JUST EVERY OTHER WEEKEND

This is about fathers' rights law, and protecting the best interests of your children. It provides information, news and comments on laws, cases and strategies for life as a single father and winning your custody, access or child support case.

Archive for June, 2009

A Perfect Father’s Day

Monday, June 22nd, 2009

The kids woke me up at a 7:00 am with a card and presents.  It was a funny card that said, “Thanks for always being there when we need you, Dad.”  Inside it said, “Can we borrow 50 bucks?”

The presents were a swim suit, some socks and underwear.  Just what I asked for.  My youngest was incredulous that anyone would ask for clothes instead of toys.

We were visiting my wife’s sister in Pennsylvania and my brother-in-law made some delicious pancakes for breakfast.  Then I spent a lazy Sunday watching my brother-in-law’s giant television, flipping between the protestors in Iran and Tiger at the US Open.

All was well. Then on the trip back home, we hit heavy traffic.  “I think I’m going to be sick,” said my youngest.  We stopped for gas and got some plastic bags for him to throw up in.  My headache got worse, we were driving into the setting sun, and I had forgotten my sunglasses.

Finally we got home.  It was time for dinner, but my oldest toasted a pop tart, I gave a couple of Ritz crackers to my youngest, and my wife got on the phone with the doctor.  I carried the suitcases upstairs.  Sighing, I made myself a peanut butter sandwich, and read a Raymond Chandler detective story, before going to bed.

Father’s Day, like every other day, comes with the good and the bad.  And being a father is not all pancakes and presents.

Coffee Shop Advice

Tuesday, June 16th, 2009

Joan and Jack, two venerable divorce lawyers, bumped into each other while having coffee in the café close to the courthouse.  They greeted each other effusively and sat down at a table together putting their legal files on empty chairs.

“I’ve got this tough case,” said Jack.  “My client is the mother and she wants the father to have no visitation at all.  The father will settle for nothing other than 50 percent of the time with the children.”

“So what are you going to do?” asked Joan.

“I’m going to tell the father that he has a career to worry about.  And he is going to want to have a social life.  There is no better baby sitter than the mother.  I’m going to try to talk him into less than 50 percent.”

“I’ve got another idea,” said Joan.

“What is it?”

“Tell the mother to let him have the children 50 percent of the time.  Lot’s of fathers idealize about custody of the children.  But once they try to juggle a career with the demands of little children, they find it is no easy task.  After a couple of weeks, he will be asking the mother to spend more time with the children.”

“Not bad,” said Jack, “For that salutary advice, I’ll buy you a doughnut.”

 
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